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Did Congress Order A "Medical Surge Capacity Drill" Right Before Covid Emerged?

From Lifesite News,

Legislation approved by Congress in the summer of 2019 ordered a “medical surge capacity” evaluation that may provide another example of the kinds of covert, public health “drills” or “exercises” authorized by federal law.

Several previous articles described significant information from U.S. federal laws, strategies, plans, and other documents which suggest that the COVID-19 pandemic may be some sort of national and international government hoax, ruse, ploy, or “health security” exercise. This article describes more significant information which suggests that COVID-19 may be a falsified pandemic.


A recent article explained what most probably already knew: if government officials wanted to attempt to protect themselves legally by attempting to “lawfully authorize” a falsified pandemic, such persons would probably not use obvious wording in such laws.


One potential method to attempt to lawfully authorize a falsified pandemic might be to use words like “public emergency exercise” instead of “hoax,” “falsified nationwide public health emergency,” or “falsified pandemic.”


But even using the wording “national exercise” or “national public health emergency exercise” might be too obvious. For example, writing “beginning within 180 days of the enactment of this Pandemic Preparedness and Response Act, there is going to be an ongoing nationwide public health emergency exercise” in a U.S. federal law or amendment would probably be too obvious. Instead of using the word “exercise,” those who write the laws might use legal descriptions of “exercise” without ever using the word “exercise;” such persons might use legal wording which implies that they are planning to carry out an exercise.


Previous articles already described some of these potential references to U.S. government officials potentially planning to carry out a national and international falsified pandemic exercise. There is one 2019 amendment, though, which has not been completely explained and appears to be one of the most significant and specific tip-offs that the U.S. government might have been attempting to lawfully authorize a falsified nationwide public health emergency exercise.


The amendment is again found in the “Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness and Advancing Innovation Act of 2019,” which was enacted only a few months before the reported outbreak of a national and international public health emergency otherwise known as the COVID-19 pandemic.


The law is in regards to the “National Disaster Medical System.” It is helpful to view the law before and after the amendment. Before the amendment, the law read as follows:


(2) Joint review and medical surge capacity strategic plan


  • Not later than 180 days after December 19, 2006, the Secretary, in coordination with the Secretary of Homeland Security, the Secretary of Defense, and the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, shall conduct a joint review of the National Disaster Medical System. Such review shall include an evaluation of medical surge capacity, as described by section 300hh–2 (a) of this title. As part of the National Health Security Strategy under section 300hh–1 of this title, the Secretary shall update the findings from such review and further modify the policies of the National Disaster Medical System as necessary. (42 U.S. Code § 300hh–11(b)(2)) before 2019 amendment)


Notably, the U.S. federal law had been in place since 2006 and then was amended only a few months before the reported outbreak of COVID-19. The 2019 amendment is found at 133 STAT. 931-933. After the 2019 amendment, the law reads:

(2) Joint review and medical surge capacity strategic plan


(A) Review


  • Not later than 180 days after June 24, 2019, the Secretary [of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services], in coordination with the Secretary of Homeland Security, the Secretary of Defense, and the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, shall conduct a joint review of the National Disaster Medical System. Such review shall include—

  • (i) an evaluation of medical surge capacity, as described in section 300hh–2(a) of this title;

  • (ii) an assessment of the available workforce of the intermittent disaster response personnel described in subsection (c);

  • (iii) the capacity of the workforce described in clause (ii) to respond to all hazards, including capacity to simultaneously respond to multiple public health emergencies and the capacity to respond to a nationwide public health emergency;

  • (iv) the effectiveness of efforts to recruit, retain, and train such workforce; and

  • (v) gaps that may exist in such workforce and recommendations for addressing such gaps. (42 U.S. Code § 300hh–11(b)(2)), emphasis added)


The amendment contains some distractions that are not going to be discussed here. The emphasized words may be significant, though.

The words are emphasized in (i) because other U.S. federal laws explain that “medical surge capacity” is “evaluated” by “drills or exercises.” Specifically, U.S. federal laws describe


  • The periodic evaluation of Federal, State, local, and tribal preparedness and response capabilities through drills and exercises, including drills and exercises to ensure medical surge capacity for events without notice (42 U.S. Code § 300hh–1(b)(1)(A))


The wording of the 2019 amendment appears to follow the method explained above: U.S. government lawmakers apparently attempting to “lawfully authorize” a specific exercise by describing in legal terminology and/or implying the planned “exercise” rather than making it obvious and explicitly using the word “exercise.”


The amendment says that the U.S. federal government “shall conduct” “an evaluation of medical surge capacity;” other federal laws specify that such “evaluation” is conducted “through drills and exercises, including drills and exercises to ensure medical surge capacity for events without notice.” Thus, a reasonable person might conclude that U.S. government officials were planning one or more medical surge capacity exercises.


There is more, though. It appears to be significant that (iii) says specifically that such a “review” which may include an “evaluation” or exercise “of medical surge capacity” shall also include “the capacity…to respond to all hazards…and the capacity to respond to a nationwide public health emergency.” The wording appears to imply a full-scale, nationwide public health emergency exercise.


Taken as a whole, the 2019 amendment is similar to a U.S. federal law describing one agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) with duties to

  • Carry out drills and operational exercises, in consultation with the Department of Homeland Security, the Department of Defense, the Department of Veterans Affairs, and other applicable Federal departments and agencies, as necessary and appropriate, to identify, inform, and address gaps in and policies related to all-hazards medical and public health preparedness and response including exercises based on—

  • (i) identified threats for which countermeasures are available and for which no countermeasures are available; and

  • (ii) unknown threats for which no countermeasures are available. (42 U.S. Code § 300hh–10(4)(G)), emphasis added)


Notice the similarity: the 2019 amendment directs the Secretary of the U.S. HHS, in coordination with the Secretary of Homeland Security, the Secretary of Defense, and the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to evaluate “the capacity…to respond to…all-hazards” and “address…gaps” etc.; the U.S. federal law on carrying out drills and operational exercises directs an agency within the U.S. HHS, “in consultation with the Department of Homeland Security, the Department of Defense, the Department of Veterans Affairs, and other applicable Federal departments and agencies” to “address gaps in and policies related to all-hazards medical and public health preparedness and response” etc.


These similarities again suggest the possibility that U.S. government officials were using legal terminology which describes “exercises” potentially to lawfully authorize, or require, a planned falsified nationwide public health emergency rather than making it obvious and actually using the word “exercise.”


There is at least one more U.S. federal law describing government “exercises” which may be relevant to this discussion. Another U.S. federal law reads:


  • During the one-year period beginning on December 19, 2006, the Secretary shall conduct an exercise to test the capability and timeliness of the National Disaster Medical System to mobilize and otherwise respond effectively to a bioterrorist attack or other public health emergency that affects two or more geographic locations concurrently. Thereafter, the Secretary may periodically conduct such exercises regarding the National Disaster Medical System as the Secretary determines to be appropriate. (42 U.S. Code § 300hh–11(a)(3)(E)), emphasis added)


When the 2019 amendment is read in comparison to U.S. federal laws on government public health emergency, all-hazards, and pandemic “exercises,” the reasonable person might conclude that it appears as though the 2019 amendment implies that a “nationwide public health emergency” “operational exercise” may have been planned to be carried out “not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness and Advancing Innovation Act of 2019.”


And what occurred within approximately 180 days of the enactment of the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness and Advancing Innovation Act of 2019? A nationwide public health emergency, otherwise known as the COVID-19 pandemic.


The 2019 amendment discussed above may be some of the most significant information suggesting that the COVID-19 pandemic may be a planned U.S. government public health emergency exercise. And there is still more information supporting this claim but it will not be mentioned here.